zftw:

genderthief:

i gave my dog a tortilla chip ten minutes ago and she won’t fucking eat it she’s just staring at me with it in her mouth 

she’s waiting for the salsa

zftw:

genderthief:

i gave my dog a tortilla chip ten minutes ago and she won’t fucking eat it she’s just staring at me with it in her mouth 

she’s waiting for the salsa

roseybutt99:

feets

roseybutt99:

feets

(Source: definitivegaze)

(Source: softwaring)

(Source: themortalyeti)

you can do it abbie! c:

@Anonymous

eee thank you! 

(Source: vinylacetat)

prettycolors:

#c4cafd

prettycolors:

#c4cafd

mecksickan:

So you just gonna bring me a birthday gift on my birthday to my birthday party on my birthday with a birthday gift?

mecksickan:

So you just gonna bring me a birthday gift on my birthday to my birthday party on my birthday with a birthday gift?

I want someone to be like “yeah you can do it Abbie!!” But no one does that, and I’m horrible at doing it for myself!!!

(Source: orsimer-witch)

loppett:

i don’t trust people who are super into “proper grammar” and “correct punctuation” because what lies just beyond that smug superiority is some sinister classism that gets acutely racist in a red hot minute, so for similar reasons I’m instantly wary of anyone who takes great pride in their love of “logic” and “intellect” 

(Source: handaxe)

In Southern Gothic, the most important concept is the grotesque. With the grotesque, reality is distorted into ugly and absurd shapes. “I use the grotesque the way I do because people are deaf and dumb and need help to see and hear,” Flannery O’Connor once said. By exaggerating reality, we are able to actually see it. The grotesque is a balance of contradictions. It creeps and crawls between repulsion and attraction, the real and the unreal, and humor and horror. The sublime floats in the mind, but the grotesque is experienced in the body—in turning stomachs, goose bumps, and sweat.